Best of Streetwear: The evolving face of urban fashion

By Kabyashree Saikia

Slides, hoodies, track suits and dark colour palettes - urban and contemporary streetwear brands seem to be taking over the youth culture by a storm

 In a society where fashion can be described as a socio-cultural phenomenon, street wear has become the new uniform for ‘cool kids’ defining youth culture around the world. With an ambiguous statement reflected through the intercultural conglomeration, the trend has managed to unite millennials from a vast array of different platforms.

As the urban menswear trend continues to take over the youth, From The Streets takes a look at some of the emerging street wear brands, which are leading the Instagram generation to a wardrobe of casual and contemporary style.

 

StayCool (NYC)

 Image courtesy: StayCool NYC

Image courtesy: StayCool NYC

After having coined the term ‘chillwear’ and introducing the trend in the streetwear market, the New York based brand Sorry I’m Not is making a name for itself through a casual and laid back vibe with its unisex collection. Combining three categories of clothing, ‘surfwear’, ‘skatewear’ and ‘streetwear’ , the retro brand aims to bring the 80’s and the 90’s fashion culture back in the scene through comfortable clothing that could  work anywhere and anytime. Bold colours, loud prints and with a vintage feeling to it, the brand’s motto suggests ‘shifting society back to a cooler place, one piece at a time.’

 

Musée Noir (London)

 Image Cortesy: Musée Noir (Not Just A Label)

Image Cortesy: Musée Noir (Not Just A Label)

After graduating from Instituto Marangoni Milan in 2013, the menswear brand has managed to create a reputation for itself through its fashion house that offers bespoke and one-off in-store designs. With a philosophy and brand ethics that serves a minimalist aesthetic by focussing on sleek and tidy cuts and silhouettes. Designed for comfort and every day wearability, Musee Noir’s latest collection is titled ‘Wandered’. It speaks for a society that reflects on the increasing disconnected relationship with the world. The design inspiration represents the ideals of an explorer, instead of focussing on wealth and a superficial lifestyle.

 

Danilo Paura (Italy)

 Image Courtesy: Danilo Paura

Image Courtesy: Danilo Paura

The Italian upcoming brand focuses on the subtle reflection of peacocking through explosive colour palettes and prints that exhibit a grungy style. Having been featured in ‘Highsnobiety’, the brand was seen taking the ‘My Closet’ capsule by storm in Paris. With key pieces like knitwear cardigans and formal, street-wear inspired jackets and blazers, the brand follows an aesthetic that focuses on representing men in a chic atmosphere, whilst being flamboyant and culturally vibrant.

 

Connor Downey (London)

 Image Courtesy: Connor Downey (Not Just A Label)

Image Courtesy: Connor Downey (Not Just A Label)

A graduate from the renowned fashion university, Central Saint Martin’s, Connor Sheridan Buchanan-Downey is a designer who reflects his belief in gender fluidity in his clothing line. In an interview with Dr. Martens the designer expressed his opinions on equal representation of gender identity through fashion and that he stands by it for he believes that fashion as a culture has equal impact on society, whether worn by the female gender or the male gender. His collection reflects his personal traits which he describes to be fun, clean and sexy. Connor Downey’s latest collection takes inspiration from the nightlife and glamorous lifestyle of New York, exhibiting the American Dream. The line features pieces such as oversized shorts, tight fitting jeans and boxer shorts in a flamboyant colour palette.

 

AJO Studio (Seoul, South Korea)

 Image Courtesy: AJO Studio

Image Courtesy: AJO Studio

The Korean street wear brand is a perfect example of the uprising millennial that believes in the artistic contemporary style. With collections sporting oversized silhouettes and unisex urban wear, the brand focuses on bringing forth the taste and choices of the youth culture changing the socio-cultural norms of this South Korean metropolitan city. Representing the stigma surrounding the definition of cool kids, AJO Studio exhibits aesthetics that speaks volumes for the evolving fashion scene of this Asian country.

 

 

Kabyashree Saikia